Category Archives: 300in6

It´s not rocket science, but prepare for lift-off

The Safe Water School project of the Swiss EAWAG (aquatic research), Helvetas and Antenna Technologies Geneva, financed by the Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development (SDC), is building a solid foundation in Bolivia, Kenya and Haiti for a large-scale adoption of school-driven water treatment.

A new Antenna video – which could well become a model of excellence for institutional progress reports – presents the key players, and their adult enablers, in the Haiti programme, known as ‘Lekol dlo san danje’ (Lit: L’école de l’eau sans danger, The school of risk-free water). Mainly French, English sub-titles, 5’40″.

The idea now, the film concludes temptingly, is to see what the results of the programme are today, and try and replicate it on a national scale in Haiti. Now, would that be ‘replikayson pou nivo nasyonal’?

[Ed: Antenna also administers SDC support to 300in6 communications services.]

Why HWTS: A sober reminder

A new study published in The Lancet this month provides the clearest picture yet of the impact and most common causes of diarrheal diseases (DD), the second leading killer of young children globally, after pneumonia. The Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) was the largest ever on DD in developing countries.
Coordinated by the Center for Vaccine Development of the University of Maryland School of Medicine (the source of this article), GEMS confirmed rotavirus – for which a vaccine already exists – as the leading cause of DD among infants. It identified other top causes – Shigella, Cryptosporidium and ST-ETEC, a type of E. coli – for which additional research is urgently needed. It found that some 20% of children under two suffer from moderate-to-severe diarrhoea each year, which increased their risk of death 8.5-fold and led to stunted growth over a two-month follow-up period.

Part of the study was to test the hypothesis that ceramic filters could eliminate the chlorine-resistant Cryptosporidium.

Check the chalk: Market-based development

The 300in6 presence at The Hague on World Water Day was seen a bit, felt a bit and heard a bit – the latter if the crsvol208num8e are correct, seeing how “one participant suggested …” a community-rooted approach, plus the overall plea for universal access to WASH services.

Our stand, and frequent video screenings, were graciously offered us, in the Market area of the celebration, reported here: 300in6-at-WWD-2013

In our quiet moments, we had time to reflect. Could conference organisers learn from how airport organisers have transformed their venues into shopping centres, on the way to the plane?

Instead of placing information markets quite a way from the high-level participants, and vice versa – by over-packing the agenda, and over again, so the HLPs cannot do any shopping trips for new ideas – how’s about allowing the market place to transform the talking shops? Doesn’t anyone walk the talk about market-driven development anymore?

No more sitting on the hedge in The Hague

Leading World Water Day 2013 is a high-level meeting in The Hague, long home to global core values and initiatives, including 300in6 — and today to our videos.

Fed by inputs from across the organs of world society, the meeting risks the repetition of old messages under new words: of exhortation and instructions to others. That’s the tired old-business as usual: you must, they should, let’s cooperate.
Let’s hope that all parties simply say “We shall”. And do.

As the sun sets over a briskly cool The Hague on 22 March, today’s leadership will be walked out of the conference building by that of tomorrow, as today’s school kids conclude their impressive Walk for Water. A picture that speaks a million words, and almost one billion new consumers, and three billion re-assured ones, of safe water.

Walk on, with hope in your hearts.

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Up until now, we haven’t had an international scheme to evaluate the performance of these products on the basis of which we can make recommendations to governments. And to UN agencies. Now we have.